Mac MaolŠin

Alumnus of Columcille (Gille Collum):

 (under construction)

 

In diverse Irish annals and charters to to the "Book of Kells", (illustrated above the Chi/Rho page) we learn our ancestors were in addition to being warrior Chieftains of the Luighne and Gaileanga territories, were also active members of a monastic order referred to as  "Alumnus of Columcille" which in the era of our surname research (9th to 12th century), had attained status of "Primacy of the Columban league of churches" based on a decision to transfer that order by the Bishop Cellach, from Iona in Scotland to Kells, along with the relics of "Columcille" as a result of constant Viking attacks and their presence in Iona.

Evidence of our surname involvement in this monastic order, begins with Lynan Mac Maolain recorded in the famous Book of Kells (UCC CORK EXTRACTS):

 

 

While difficult to read resulting from the script style and fading after a thousand years, the actual location of the text in this document is highlighted by the word O'Laecaib which translates to Laity:

 

Tribal links of the Gaileanga Mora to monastic sites such as Clonmacnoise and Bealach Duin (Keim Castlekeeran) were recorded earlier.  The links of family Maelan/Mac Maelan to the monastic site of Kells can be found in the annals:

U1050.3 Maelán, lector of Cenannas, and the most learned of all the Irish, a distinguished sage, died.

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U1051.4 Laidcnén son of Maelán, king of Gailenga, went with his queen, i.e. the daughter of the Got, to Rome on his pilgrimage and died.

U1051.4 Laidhgnen m. Maelain, ri Gaileng, cum sua regina, .i. ingen In Guit, do dul dia ailithri do Roim & a ec.

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T1065.5 Leochan son of Mac Maoláin, king of the Gailenga, was slain by Conchobhar Ó Maolseachlainn. 

U1076.3 Murchadh son of Flann ua Mael Sechlainn, king of Temair for three nights, was killed in the bell-tower of Cenannas by the grandson of Maelán, king of Gailenga.

 

 

 

 

 

This monastic site of Kells remained the primacy, of the alumnus until the 1158 synod of Brí meic Thaidc (in Co. Meath), which established the authority of the abbot of Derry, Flaithbertach Ua Brolcháin (qv), over the Columban federation. Scot historians recorded a Gillacrist, son of Mhaolain as migrating from Ireland to Dunkeld (suggested progenitor Clan McMillan), the Mhaolain born circa 1100 his son 1132. 

Later, that authority was more clearly defined when Columban churches in Meath and in Leinster were declared to be free from lay taxation. 

 Breifny Antiquarian Society research records, include the O’Reilly notice of Conchubar Mac Maoilin 1162 AD as the Abbot of Kells, included as part of their submission and regrant of territory (his forename a probable connection to the Mael Seachlain maternal lineage of Gott MaelSeachlain son of Conchubar).

Driven out by the invading Normans under De Lacy,  who at first demolished, then rebuilt Ceannanus, this Mac Maolain family migrated to an area under control of the Ui Diarmada (Loch Ce). One of his grandsons Clarus Mac Maolain would be appointed an Archdeacon of Elphin, Roscommon, and later migrate with a group of monastics back to the area of Loch Oughter in Co Cavan, occupying an island townland named Trinity, given to him by the O’Reilly chieftain of east Briefne